Saturday, June 15, 2019

YA Book Review--Consequences by Darlene McGarrity


SUMMARY:

Second chances lead to new beginnings... sometimes, they lead to murder. Seventeen-year-old Rose Jackson is a self-righteous, nature-loving truth seeker whose rocky relationship with her mother, Doris Murphy, is tested after Rose is court ordered to a youth house.
With six months left before she goes in front of a judge for potential release, her patience is tested between an in-house bully, her neglectful mother, and an inappropriate therapist.
Fed up, Rose runs away before her court date and settles in a town she randomly chose on a map. Misinterpretation ensues as she falls for a town local, goes head to head with a biker gang, and the unthinkable happens.
Can Rose succeed in finding the freedom she craves or will her determination cost her everything?

REVIEW--5-STAR AMAZON


Rose Jackson has got a big problem, being institutionalized in a youth house, filled with chaos, nasty counselors and a depraved therapist. She's worse off than inmate, and her drug-addicted mother had everything to do with her landing in the hellhole. Although she's just under eighteen, Rose is not going to wait a minute longer and manages a covert escape into the freedom she desperately craves, otherwise she'll lose her sanity.

She hikes miles and miles with sparse belongings and little money to land in a strange little town that she's picked on a map. She finds out real quick she's a Philly city girl trapped in a wayward town of drunks, misfits and bikers. She meets up with a biker prospect, Tucker, who takes her under his wing.  It just so happens that when Tucker gets his colors, he has to surrender a gift to the biker boys. He won't have--she won't have it--and they hike and ride for their lives. Meanwhile, her mother, who has sobered up and kicked drugs is desperate to find her daughter who escaped the youth house without her knowledge.

Consequences is a thriller, a coming of age story and a slow burn romance all rolled up into one. It's a relentless chase and survival story, with harrowing scenes and tragedy. Rose is steadfast and courageous, fighting back at every turn. You just have to root for her, and find out how she's going to get out of her next jam.

This was wonderfully written, the author using all five senses to describe and paint stunning visuals. The characters are diverse and well drawn. This was a page-turner and had some abrupt detours and spins. The young adult voice was captured very naturally. I would recommend this to teens who love frantic adventure, and adults who appreciate grownup themes. I think Ms Darlene A. McGarrity has got a future in the YA category. This tome begs a sequel.

AUTHOR INFO:

Darlene A McGarrity 

Darlene was born and raised in Philadelphia but now resides in Bucks County, PA. Nature fuels her bones along with the love of a rescued black cat, wonderful husband, and strong coffee. She has been writing seriously since 2006, despite starting back in 1997. Some of her favorite authors include Stephen King, Kurt Vonnegut, Ann Rule, Edgar Allan Poe, and Chuck Wendig.

She uses music to adjust any mood for writing, for driving, and for life.


Nature is her church. 

AMAZON LINK:
https://www.amazon.com/Darlene-A.-McGarrity/e/B078H5ZD3H/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07QTFHZ79/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i1



 

Friday, May 31, 2019

THE AWARD CONTEST IS HERE!

Hello fellow scribes. I'm now eligible for the EPIC FANTASY FANATICS READERS CHOICE AWARDS. I would be solely indebted for your one-click nomination for Screamcatcher. My team thinks we can pull a spot in this prestigious event. Please tell your friends to do likewise. Your nominations will get me into the quarter finals. from there on, the semi-finals will be in sight. We have about two hundred entries and each entry must stockpile 100 nominations to advance. I couldn't tell you what this means to me. I have a hoard of supporters who are intent on helping me out. I can't thank you enough for your time and consideration. There's no need to sign in or reveal any of your personal info. You click and you are out. Blessed be. Here's the link:

https://epicfantasyfanatics.com/screamcatcher-christy-j-breedlove/?fbclid=IwAR1YbLzoK7rBsjWJEdbwCd-Ighd1FVHBZS_KBrTfdSgENDXv4zVQTaU57sw

If you have problems bringing up the site, please contact me at   stevenson_333@msn.com  

Friday, May 24, 2019

The Mysterious Teenage Hominid

 Writing For Teens:

There was no question why I wrote YA fiction in the first place. When I got into it, it was a thrilling, lucrative and expressive category. Harry Potter was dominating the charts. The Hunger Games appeared, along with Divergent and Twilight. Writing young adult fiction then was like being on s speeding freight train which had no brakes and a throttle that only went forward.

There are no estimates of how many writers jumped on that band wagon.

I remember my first real YA book, The Girl They Sold to the Moon. That tiny tome sold six times and took the first place grand prize in a YA novel writing contest, which was sponsored by a small publisher. That wasn't the reason I wrote it. I wrote it because I loved the characters, not the atmosphere, world or environment. Yet again, something clicked inside me. I had a handle on something. I could talk teen. Not spectacularly, but well enough to pull the wool.

Let me get something out of the way before I continue: I have a non de plume for my young adult stories--Christy J. Breedlove. There's no mystery in changing a name for a genre. But I changed my gender. J.K. Rowling's agent told her to give herself a neutral author name because "boys are less likely to read books written by girls." Hence, the J.K. initials. I just took it a step further. 

I believe women can be trusted by other women to write with more emotional impact and feeling. Women don't really have any problems reading the several male authors out there who excel in writing romance. However, women are less likely to read a romance crafted by a guy because it can't quite reach inside them like one of their own. I hoped and prayed that if spontaneous buyers of my young adult books believed they were crafted by a gal (at first), it might go easier for me. Even men believe that gals can lay down a young adult story with more connection and honesty. I know I do. So, no gender bias meant at all. Only respect.  (And no, I don't think I'm fooling anyone :)

Back on track: The teenage years are restless and oft times reckless years. They are an era in life that explores change, hopes, failures, experimentation, rebellion and growth. Especially growth. Most fundamental truisms are picked up during these formative years--rules or guidelines for life. What appeals to me so much about this time of life is that it can be so unstable. It's a time when tragic mistakes are made--emotional upheaval is magnified. To me, this gives me a sense of freedom in exploring some deep-felt topics. Unlike an adult that might be more prone to decorum and subtly, a teen might very well blunder into a situation, causing higher consequences and repercussions. 

The exploration of the teen mind can offer a ton of latitude in subject matter--life, death, love, hatred, bullying, lawlessness, substance abuse, incest, pregnancy and even murder. The young, let's face it, are resilient, forceful and courageous with their own convictions. They can take a hell of a lot of punishment, rebound and get their life's compass back on direction in record time. Sometimes they fail, but the harder they fail, the harder they strive to crush the demons. 

My guilty pleasure in writing for, or about teens, is my utter fascination with their nonconformity. Looking back upon my own kid-hood, I can glimpse my errors and snippets of absolute stupidity. This stupidity allows me cartloads of humor and irony in my writing. There is nothing quite like a couple of teens going at it verbally or physically, and in many cases, only to drive a point home. There's nothing quite like a teen hitting you smack between the eyes with blunt-force honesty. They regularly deal with each other in absolute truth. No words minced. Compared to adults, teens act; there's no lolly gagging. We do have the quiet, shy and retiring types, but those are exceptions, to what I think is the overall demeanor.

In an action/adventure tale, or a post-apocalyptic story, I can bring teens to the edge of death several times and have them ultimately survive. Physiologically, younger adults are more fit than adults. Have you ever seen a walking antibiotic? They can suffer and endure much more abuse than an older person. I have been known to take advantage of this fact time and time again. Youth--strength--indestructibility.   

I think teen fiction offers higher stakes, loftier emotions and grander outcomes. Nowhere is YA fiction better told than in the hands of the teenagers themselves. The young set has a finger directly on the pulse of their own lifestyles. They don't have to guess or research what they would do in any given circumstances--they know exactly the ways in which they would handle it, along with their own cultural oddities that so confuse the adults. Teens have a language all their own. You need a decoder ring to understand it. Look at their text messages--you need a cypher to crack them! Trust me, teens are not of this Earth!

As a person in my sixties, I cannot understand why I feel I was chosen to write young adult tales. Those years were some of the fondest times of my life. I don't look back upon them with disdain. Albeit, there were many cringe-worth times. There were stage plays and scenes of stark terror. But I remember them with an awestruck gusto, a bewildering time of adventure and exploration. My over-the-top emotional writing style seems to fit right into the plots and characters. I'm always learning, because there are so many writers out there, both young and old, who are masters at expressing the teen world. 

I'm only along for the ride.

I have a lot of reviews that are about to come in for this latest book. The trickle has started. So far everything seems beyond expectations. Yet, all of these reviewers seem to be teen or twenty-something women. I can just about guarantee that if I've got something wrong in the text, it's apt to be flagged. And I welcome that. It just means that I get to learn more secrets.

Christy/Chris--red-shifting outta here.

(BTW, blue shift means to come toward you. Red-shift means leaving or going away from you).